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The Great Stalactite

Located in the west coast of Ireland amidst the crashing waves and ocean spray of the Wild Atlantic Way and the lush green pasture and rolling hills of Co Clare, the Burren is a fascinating limestone landscape. It is the only place in the world where artic, alpine and Mediterranean plants grow side-by-side. Although, to the naked eye, the Burren may look like it is “country where there is not water enough to drown a man, wood enough to hang one or earth enough to bury him” as stated by one of Cromwell generals Ludlow, in fact the Burren is rich in diversity of flora and fauna with plenty fertile soil. When you visit the Burren the beauty of its rugged rocky landscape interspersed with rich green pasture is obvious, however, what is not obvious is the beauty that lies beneath the pale limestone flags. Underneath the Burren, in a world carved by water, there are some incredible stories and hidden gems that you should not miss when you visit the BurrenDoolin Cave Great Stalactite

The Burren is home to the longest free hanging stalactite in the Northern Hemisphere. The “Great Stalactite” is a stunning wonder of nature that has been from a single drop of water over hundreds of thousands of years underneath the rocky landscape of the Burren, Co. Clare, Ireland. It is set in the heart of Doolin Cave, suspended like a great chandelier from the ceiling of a large chamber. The Great stalactite is over 27 feet long and weighs over 10 tonnes, as tall as a two-storey house and weighing the same as approximately four African elephants. In 2006 the Browne family, protectors of the Great Stalactite, opened Doolin as a visitor attraction in Doolin to allow the public to get a glimpse of the magnificent underworld of the Burren and the Great Stalactite. Opening hours for Doolin Cave are as follows March-October with fully guided tours every hour (March – May and October) and fully guided tours every half hour (June – September). For further information and to book tickets go to www.doolincave.ie